Blog /Technology

Building multifunctional websites and web applications is hardly an easy task. We support ourselves in this process with various programming languages and tools.

We are the largest and best-known company dealing with creating and supporting Drupal-based websites in Poland. Our areas of expertise also include Symfony, PHP, ReactJS and front-end development. In our endeavours, we also use a variety of other software solutions, such as PHPStorm, Jenkins and Docker.

We are happy to share our experiences, describing the process of work on building and developing websites and applications at Droptica. Thanks to SCRUM and the right tools such as Slack and Jira, we ensure seamless communication between the team and the client. We systematically improve or change the software we use in order to automate repetitive actions and speed up the development work.

You can learn more about the ins and outs of our work thanks to our extensive blog articles, or you can find out what benefits we can offer you thanks to our Case Studies.

JetBrains PhpStorm is software that probably needs no introduction to anyone in the development community. It's one of the most popular solutions of this type available on the market. The IDE (Integrated Development Environment), already in its basic version, provides the necessary tools for efficient and effective work, and thanks to the extensive library of additional extensions, it can be made even more flexible and adapted to individual needs.

In this article, we'll discuss the differences, advantages, and disadvantages of both of these solutions. However, before this happens, we'll briefly remind you how websites work and how it’s possible that, regardless of what device we use to surf the web, we only need an internet connection and any device with a browser.

In the process of creating a product, every person working on a given problem may have a slightly different approach to solving it. These don’t necessarily have to be big differences. It's enough to interpret the idea differently for the finished solution to not fully suit the product owner. Establishing clear and transparent acceptance criteria will help streamline your software development, as well as allow for the prevention of possible misunderstandings.

We use multiple environments when developing software. We care most about the production environment which is accessible to all users. In the test environment, we check that the changes we make function as they should. There is also a local environment - we could say it is the most important one. It is where application development and maintenance starts. What exactly is it, what does it provide us with and how do we generate it? Let's get down to specifics.

It would be a strange world if we didn’t use names, but call each other "you" or, even worse, use numbers. In everyday life, we are well aware of the importance of our name. Some even ascribe to it meanings or magical powers that contribute to success in private and professional life. Therefore, it shouldn't be surprising that the name of our website domain is as important as our own name.

In the world of application development, API is a great way to upload and retrieve the data we need. The mechanisms responsible for sharing data in an API can be either simple services providing information on currency exchange rates, or carry out more complicated processes, allowing for creating users or processing larger amounts of data. However, what if we want to test or check what result will be returned to us by a particular API?

When writing code, it’s easy to make mistakes or errors. They can happen to anyone, at any stage of work. What to do if our code result doesn’t match our expectations or we aren’t sure what data are processed at particular steps? In such a situation, we can spend hours looking for a solution or use a debugger to make our work easier.

We all associate programming with creating lines of code - for some it’s clear at the first glance, for others it’s a kind of magic incantation. However, modern programming is much more than just entering successive pieces of code. Then, what tools can make a developer's work easier and allow to streamline, automate, and have control over everything that is now inextricably linked with software development?

Maintaining the existing code is a very important process that shouldn't be downplayed. Unfortunately, more time and resources are often spent on implementing new functionalities at the expense of maintaining the current code. Of course, we all may sometimes be asking ourselves: why fix something that already works? What benefits may it bring?

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